Dumaguete Info Search


  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Health & Wellness Health and Hospitals

Discussion in 'Businesses - Services - Products' started by Dave_Hounddriver, May 10, 2017.

  1. DavyL200

    DavyL200 DI Forum Luminary ★ Global Mod ★ Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

    Messages:
    3,053
    Trophy Points:
    371
    Location:
    On an island
    Ratings:
    +3,586 / -0
    Just my personal view of health care in the ph! Hope thats an ok comment?
     
  2. PatO

    PatO DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Veteran Marines

    Messages:
    4,530
    Trophy Points:
    386
    Ratings:
    +2,243 / -1
    All of this makes me wonder, is the hospital to blame or the poor health of the foreigner not getting regular checkups then hoping to being saved in a third world country when the grim reaper comes calling. Obviously, Dumaguete does not provide world class health care. Try and pay fo St. Lukes
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. OP
    OP
    Dave_Hounddriver

    Dave_Hounddriver DI Forum Patron Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

    Messages:
    1,343
    Trophy Points:
    301
    Ratings:
    +1,616 / -2
    We, on this forum, often blame the electric company when they cannot keep up with the demand for electricity. We often blame the city when the roads cannot keep up with the ever increasing amount of vehicles and people. We tend to blame the ISP when they cannot keep up with the ever increasing demands for bandwidth.

    Why would we not blame the hospital for failing to keep up with the increasing demands from a growing population?

    Are any of these blame games helpful? Probably not but I read a lot of it on forums and hear about it in the coffee shops. The amazing thing is that there is still enough municipal water for the growing throngs of people moving to Dumaguete and surrounding area.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  4. Jack Peterson

    Jack Peterson DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster SC Connoisseur Veteran Air Force

    Messages:
    8,323
    Trophy Points:
    436
    Occupation:
    Happily Retired
    Location:
    Northern Junob, Dumaguete City
    Ratings:
    +4,256 / -0
    I think we have a Quality issue here rather than a Quantity
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. Brian Oinks

    Brian Oinks That's Mr. Pig to you Boy! :) Highly Rated Poster

    Messages:
    1,514
    Trophy Points:
    206
    Location:
    Negros Oriental - Near to Zamboanguita ;)
    Ratings:
    +985 / -1
    Blood Type:
    A+
    I think it is a bit of both, when you have many people lining up waiting their turn then to slipstream operations, you employ more people to deal with them, and if tools of the trade are needed to do so then so be it, buy the tools so the workers can use them to service the customers waiting at the door... The Philippines HAS AN OVER SUPPLY of young Nurses and Doctors waiting for placements here or abroad, USE THEM instead of spending a Billion Dollars building Bridges or USELESS underground Car Parks! :banghead:
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. Jack Peterson

    Jack Peterson DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster SC Connoisseur Veteran Air Force

    Messages:
    8,323
    Trophy Points:
    436
    Occupation:
    Happily Retired
    Location:
    Northern Junob, Dumaguete City
    Ratings:
    +4,256 / -0
    I would say a lot of both, The thing is it is not just in the Philippines it is a worrying Factor to WHO (World Health organisation) in that Understaffing creates a % drop of Nursing/medical personnel to patient ratio and in turn will give poorer Quality of Car to the Patient. Way back in the 60's when my First Wife was a Student Nurse, this was the Biggest gripe of the Health Authorities & the Hospitals they oversaw. It is not a new thing as with many problems in the World but For me, it one issue that should be Addressed more actively than it is. Likely the Government Hospitals may progress on this but in the Private Sector I can't see much Change in the near Future. Peso versus People Scratching Head.jpg Guess what wins
    It is very easy for us to point a finger at any given thing but those of us that used Tools know you can only be as good as those Tools you use, Making a makeshift job with Bad tools is just never going to work.

    As I saw recently at SUMC table thumping by a Local got him nowhere and of course it will not get anyone else anywhere, We really must just go with Flow. However, at some Ridiculous Figure for my MIL in ICU per day, we (My wife and I) made sure that we got what we were paying For and that meant a Nurse Watcher very regularly ( as it was chargeable but never seemed to happen when we arrived each day) I asked why are you not here when we arrive, OH! Cos I was delivering Food. Now that is an Area they could be looking at. Trained Nurses doing an Ancillary task? OK in an emergency situation But Some (Most?) Hospitals all over the Word do not to me, know how to Fully Utilize/Optimize the resources they have to hand albeit limited at times.

    JMHO
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    Last edited: May 14, 2017
  7. Brian Oinks

    Brian Oinks That's Mr. Pig to you Boy! :) Highly Rated Poster

    Messages:
    1,514
    Trophy Points:
    206
    Location:
    Negros Oriental - Near to Zamboanguita ;)
    Ratings:
    +985 / -1
    Blood Type:
    A+
    A comparison of Health cover worldwide; (Interesting!)

    Which countries have the best healthcare?
    Of the 20 countries heading up the list, all but Australia and Japan are in western Europe, where virtually every nation boasts some form of universal health coverage

    PARIS, France – Neither Canada nor Japan cracked the top 10, and the United States finished a dismal 35th, according to a much anticipated ranking of healthcare quality in 195 countries, released Friday, May 19.

    Among nations with more than a million souls, top honors for 2015 went to Switzerland, followed by Sweden and Norway, though the healthcare gold standard remains tiny Andorra, a postage stamp of a country nestled between Spain (No. 8) and France (No. 15).

    Iceland (No. 2), Australia (No. 6), Finland (No. 7), the Netherlands (No. 9) and financial and banking center Luxembourg rounded out the first 10 finishers, according to a comprehensive study published in the medical journal The Lancet.

    Of the 20 countries heading up the list, all but Australia and Japan (No. 11) are in western Europe, where virtually every nation boasts some form of universal health coverage.

    Rank Country Rank Country
    1 Andorra 11 Japan
    2 Iceland 12 Italy
    3 Switzerland 13 Ireland
    4 Sweden 14 Austria
    5 Norway 15 France
    6 Australia 16 Belgium
    7 Finland 17 Canada
    8 Spain 18 Slovenia
    9 Netherlands 19 Greece
    10 Luxembourg 20 Germany
    The United States – where a Republican Congress wants to peel back reforms that gave millions of people access to health insurance for the first time – ranked below Britain, which placed 30th.

    The Healthcare Access and Quality Index, based on death rates for 32 diseases that can be avoided or effectively treated with proper medical care, also tracked progress in each nation compared to the benchmark year of 1990.

    Virtually all countries improved over that period, but many – especially in Africa and Oceania – fell further behind others in providing basic care for their citizens.

    With the exceptions of Afghanistan, Haiti and Yemen, the 30 countries at the bottom of the ranking were all in sub-Saharan Africa, with the Central African Republic suffering the worst standards of all.

    "Despite improvements in healthcare quality and access over 25 years, inequality between the best and worst performing countries has grown," said Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, and leader of a consortium of hundreds of contributing experts.

    A warning sign

    Furthermore, he added in a statement, the standard of primary care was lower in many nations than expected given levels of wealth and development.

    The biggest underachievers in Asia included Indonesia, the Philippines, India and tiny Brunei, while in Africa it was Botswana, South Africa and Lesotho that had the most room for improvement. Regions with healthcare systems under performing relative to wealth included Oceania, the Caribbean and Central Asia.

    Among rich nations, the worst offender in this category was the United States, which tops the world in per capita healthcare expenditure by some measures.

    Within Europe, Britain ranked well below expected levels.

    "The UK does well in some areas, including cerebrovascular disease," noted co-author Marin McKee, a professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. "But it lags behind in outcomes of some cancers."

    The gap between actual and expected rating widened over the last quarter century in 62 of the 195 nations examined.

    "Overall, our results are a warning sign that heightened healthcare access and quality is not an inevitable product of increased development," Murray said.

    Between 1990 and 2015, countries that made the biggest improvements in delivering healthcare included South Korea, Turkey, Peru, China and the Maldives.

    The 32 diseases for which death rates were tracked included tuberculosis and other respiratory infections; illnesses that can be prevented with vaccines (diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus and measles); several forms of treatable cancer and heart disease; and maternal or neonatal disorders.


    Which countries have the best healthcare?

    [​IMG]
     
    • Informative Informative x 2

Share This Page

Loading...